birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! If this one’s too small, you can read it on my site here. The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.
If you like my work, check out my Patreon, which is just $1.74 away from $200!


For teaching: zoology

birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! If this one’s too small, you can read it on my site here. The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

If you like my work, check out my Patreon, which is just $1.74 away from $200!

For teaching: zoology

compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!
You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb


For teaching: entomology? human anatomy?

compoundchem:

A final word on insect venoms, with a look at the Schmidt Pain Index, developed by Dr. Justin Schmidt to rank the pain of the various insect stings he experienced in his line of work. Whilst obviously pain is subjective, and you’d expect some variation from person to person, it still makes for an interesting graphic!

You can see a larger version at the foot of yesterday’s post, here: http://wp.me/p4aPLT-rb

For teaching: entomology? human anatomy?

zerostatereflex:

Four Billion BCE: Battered Earth 

"No place on Earth was safe. Four billion years ago, during the Hadean eon, our Solar System was a dangerous shooting gallery of large and dangerous rocks and ice chunks."

(The gif above shows impacts over time: “Spatial distribution and sizes of craters formed on the early Earth. Each circle indicates the final estimated crater size; color coding indicates time of impact. Credit: Simone Marchi/SwRI.”)

For teaching: geology, history of life on earth

ferr0uswheel:

ryanandmath:

Imagine you wanted to measure the coastline of Great Britain. You might remember from calculus that straight lines can make a pretty good approximation of curves, so you decide that you’re going to estimate the length of the coast using straight lines of the length of 100km (not a very good estimate, but it’s a start). You finish, and you come up with a total costal length of 2800km. And you’re pretty happy. Now, you have a friend who also for some reason wants to measure the length of the coast of Great Britain. And she goes out and measures, but this time using straight lines of the length 50km and comes up with a total costal length of 3400km. Hold up! How can she have gotten such a dramatically different number?

It turns out that due to the fractal-like nature of the coast of Great Britain, the smaller the measurement that is used, the larger the coastline length will be become. Empirically, if we started to make the measurements smaller and smaller, the coastal length will increase without limit. This is a problem! And this problem is known as the coastline paradox.

By how fractals are defined, straight lines actually do not provide as much information about them as they do with other “nicer” curves. What is interesting though is that while the length of the curve may be impossible to measure, the area it encloses does converge to some value, as demonstrated by the Sierpinski curve, pictured above. For this reason, while it is a difficult reason to talk about how long the coastline of a country may be, it is still possible to get a good estimate of the total land mass that the country occupies. This phenomena was studied in detail by Benoit Mandelbrot in his paper “How Long is the Coast of Britain" and motivated many of connections between nature and fractals in his later work.

that’s an interesting paradox. fractals solve every problem. 

For teaching: mathematics

Sorry I’ve been away for a while. Here’s something to tide you over:

Could your birthday predict your fate? -BBC

At the very least, the findings give us a better insight into the rich tapestry of influences guiding our destiny. Clearly our genes and our upbringing are the overriding factors, but if something as random as our birth month can shape our mental health and lifespan, what other factors could be determining our fortune? Our fates may not be written in the stars, but we are only just beginning to understand the many other invisible forces that direct the path of our lives from the very day we are conceived.

For teaching: human anatomy / psychology, public health

amroyounes:

This might be useful to students as they get ready to go back to school.

Load up your scholarly ninja bag with some tips and tricks on getting more out of google!

Also, a couple of tricks to hack the youtube videos so you can download them or mp3-ize them in case you do not already know.

For teaching: how to find things out